5 Signs of Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder is a mental condition characterized by instability in mood and relationships that negatively impacts many areas of one’s life, such as the ability to regulate one’s emotions, to maintain relationships and to excel in occupational or educational settings. BPD presents many challenges to the individual with the diagnosis as well as others in the person’s life, due to the often unpredictable and risky behavior that manifests due to the disorder. If you are concerned that you may be in relationship to someone with Borderline Personality Disorder, listed below are some tips for spotting BDP:

 
 

1 | You walk on eggshells

One of the most common signs that you are in relationship to someone with BPD is that you’ll feel like you have to “walk on eggshells” around the person, for fear that something you do or say might “set them off.” People with BPD are often highly reactive to situation where they are perceived to be offended by someone. This can make it tough to feel comfortable around these folks.

2 | They feel betrayed

Some indicators that a loved one may have BPD is if they express to you an intense fear of betrayal or a sense of emptiness inside. This could manifest as your loved one taking it personally if you need to leave their house early or cancel plans with you. Instead of seeing that life circumstances popped up unexpectedly, they are likely to see your cancellation as an abandonment.

3 | You can’t predict their moods

BPD is often misdiagnosed at Bipolar Disorder, which shares the common element of labile mood (meaning a mood that fluctuated between highs and lows,) however BPD is unique in the profound effects it has on the individual’s instability in interpersonal relationships, as well.

4 | One day you’re great, the next you’re awful

It is often said that, in relationship to an individual with BPD, one day you’re the best thing since sliced bread and the next day you’re the scum of the Earth. This is because people with BPD experience rapid fluctuations in their appraisal of the people in their lives.

5 | They can be hurtful

When a person with BPD becomes offended, they can retaliate with very hurtful and disturbing words and actions. Because of this, it is very difficult for individuals with BPD to preserve healthy relationships with other people.

Did any of these signs resonate with you? If they did, I know how challenging it is to be in relationship to someone with BPD. If you are interested in exploring your relationship further and the effects it may be having on you, I highly suggest counseling. Working with a therapist can help you establish and maintain healthy boundaries with your loved one with BPD. You can find a local referral here, or if you live in the Los Angeles area, you can work with meIf you feel that you may be in an abusive relationship with an individual with BPD, please read my intimate partner violence series for more information and resources.


about the author

Hi! I'm Natalie. And I'm passionate about helping people create healthy relationships in their lives. Through couples counseling in Pasadena and here on the blog, it's my mission to help foster stronger connections, healthy communication and life-long love.

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A Couple's Guide to get Started Budgeting

Personally, I love budgeting. I love it so much that I have a paper version, an app on my phone, and a google sheet that all tell me the same thing: where is my money going? (Compulsive much? Yes!) I know I have an obsession but here are my reasons why you and your partner should create a budget and see if it helps you refrain from arguing about money:

 
 

1 | Visual access to your spending

You actually get to see where your money is going. I know everyone has their bank statements and some things vary from month to month (like PG&E or dining expenses) but for the most part, what you spend has some degree of consistency. This can aid in the reduction of fighting because you won’t be like my friend and look at your bank account one day and realize you and your boyfriend have $40 to last you the rest of the month. (YIKES!) The budget is an assistant in communication.

2 | Freedom to tailor your budget to you

Now that you know what you spend, you can create a budget that matches it. Or reduces it if that’s your goal too. I use Mint, a free app that allows you to carry your budget in your pocket wherever you go. (Disclaimer: you do have to allow access to your bank/credit card accounts but it’s totally legit and user-friendly.) Unlike my mother, who thinks my budget is the end-all be-all of money spending (I like to cap my monthly outings at around $50 a month and we have differing views. Let’s leave it at that); it is totally up to you and your partner how much you want to spend or save. I know people who budget for $1,000 every month for entertainment and that’s completely fine if it’s within your means. You know where your money is going. That’s great!

3 | You can address the ‘Who is paying for what?’ question

It’s date night — who picks up the tab? Reference your money spending tool. Did both you and your spouse factor outings into the budget? If so, then it’s still within the collective budget regardless of who pays this time. Hopefully next time it’ll be the other person’s treat. One of my most cherished ideals is being fair. Everyone says “Life isn’t fair” but my rebuttal is “but you can try to be fair to everyone in life.” For example, I know a couple who don’t make the same amount of money; one person pays more for rent than the other. But they came to the agreement that each would pay 35% of their income. So even though it’s not splitting rent 50/50 it’s still equal in terms of what each person can afford. The budget can aid in deciding how much one person pays for things you both use.

It’s easy to swipe your card and not think twice about what that swipe represents. With the budget, you can see what is going where. Everyone works hard to earn their money; a budget shows you what’s going on and will give your partner some insight to spending and saving habits. The beauty of the budget is you can do it for yourself (if you and your partner don’t share money) or you can do it as a couple (if you do share money and would like to know just how the heck you only have $40 left for the rest of the month!) and it will be beneficial regardless! Maybe creating a budget won’t eliminate all fights about money but I sincerely believe it could help. Remember the budget is not meant to be one size fits all. Talk it over with your partner and figure out where each of you stands.

Now, I’d love to hear your feedback. Did you try the budget? If so, what were your results? Do you have another way to diminish your fights about money? Please share in the comments below. Good luck in your spending ventures. Thank you for reading!


about the author

Hi! I'm Trina. I graduated from U.C. Santa Cruz with a B.A. in Psychology (cum laude, but no one is keeping score, right?) I enjoy re-reading Harry Potter and extensively Googling new words. My aim in writing for this blog is to help couples overcome hurdles in their relationships.

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How do I Know it's Time to Just Move on?

Not knowing whether to stay in a relationship or leave feels like being stuck between a rock and a hard place. On one hand, you know that you're not quite satisfied with what is, so you don't feel like staying, yet the idea of leaving and losing that person you care for seems too way too hard, especially if you still have strong feelings for this person. I've worked with many individuals and couples and have seen people work through all kinds of issues. However, there are certain characteristics that make it clear to me that the best course of action would be to just move on:

 
 

1 | Your partner is not interested in growth

If you are interested in self-growth, self-help, reading, learning, seeking guidance and making yourself a generally better person and your partner isn't like that, it might be time to move on. When one member of a couple is constantly evolving and bettering themselves and the other is remaining stagnant, that is a recipe for an unbalanced relationship. It will be challenging to see eye to eye, and this discrepancy will only continue to expand as you develop further.

2 | Your partner is unwilling to talk about their feelings

As uncomfortable as it can be to talk about our emotions, it is absolutely necessary for a relationship to thrive. If your partner is unwilling to explore emotional territory, this doesn't bode well for the relationship. We need to be able to be vulnerable enough to share our emotional experience with our partner and we need that back from them too in order to feel deeply connected to that person. If your partner has difficulty with this, but is working on it, great! However, if your partner doesn't see the value in expressing emotion or refuses to grow in this area, it might be time to walk away.

3 | You don't trust your partner

It's normal to have trust issues! Many people carry around the weight of previous betrayals if they haven't adequately processed through the hurt and consciously let go of those experiences. Lingering trust issues can inadvertently create tension within your relationship -- manifesting as jealousy, controlling behavior, doubting your partner's motives, etc. If you're willing to take responsibility for your inability to trust and work on it, that's wonderful. But if your partner has acted (or continues to act) in ways that reasonably diminish your trust in them and that despite your best efforts you still don't trust them, then it might be time to reevaluate the relationship.

4 | You feel worse around your partner

Intimate relationships are satisfying and fulfilling when spending time with and talking over the phone to our partner uplifts our mood and inspires us. This may seem obvious, but when with your partner, for the most part, you should feel better, not worse! If your partner is constantly complaining and focusing on the negative, then start to ask yourself, "what is this person contributing to my life?" If someone is bringing in more negativity than positivity, it might be time to consider a break-up.

5 | Your partner is abusive

Don't skip over this step! You might be thinking "oh no, that can't apply to me." But I was in an abusive relationship for almost 5 years without knowing it was abuse. Please read my Intimate Partner Violence Series for more information on this.

I hope this article is helpful to you in exploring more deeply what you believe is best for you. As a therapist I never tell my clients what to do in a given situation. Instead, I educate them as much as I can and I help them connect to their own desires and intuition so they can make a decision from a place of clarity and authenticity. I wish you the best of luck! Leave a comment below if you have any questions or thoughts about this topic. I'd love to hear from you.


about the author

Hi! I'm Natalie. And I'm passionate about helping people create healthy relationships in their lives. Through couples counseling in Pasadena and here on the blog, it's my mission to help foster stronger connections, healthy communication and life-long love.

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